MLA Citation: Bloomfield, Louis A. "Question 838"
How Everything Works 18 Jan 2018. 18 Jan 2018 <http://howeverythingworks.org/print1.php?QNum=838>.
838. What is a kVA? Can you convert watts to kVA? - M
kVA is the product of kilovolts (kV) times amperes (A) and is a measure of power. In fact, if you multiply the voltage in volts delivered to an electric heater by the current in amperes sent through that heater, you will obtain the electric power in watts consumed by the heater. Thus the heater's power consumption in watts is the same as the product of its voltage times its current, or its kVA. However, there are many devices that don't behave like an electric heater. The heater is purely resistive, while many other devices such as motors are both resistive and reactive. Reactive devices don't obey Ohm's law and may not draw their peak currents at times of peak voltage. Therefore, the power in watts consumed by a reactive device isn't the same as the product of its current times its voltage, or its kVA.

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