MLA Citation: Bloomfield, Louis A. "Question 1343"
How Everything Works 17 Oct 2017. 17 Oct 2017 <http://howeverythingworks.org/print1.php?QNum=1343>.
1343. Is it possible to create a magnet with more north poles than south poles? — GS
Yes, but only if some of the poles are weaker than other so that when you sum up the total north pole strength and the total south pole strength, those two sums are equal. For example, you can make a magnet that has two north poles and one south pole if the north poles are each half as strong as the south pole. All magnets that we know of have exactly equal amounts of north and south pole. That's because we have never observed a pure north or a pure south pole in nature and you'd need such a pure north or south pole to unbalance the poles of a magnet. A

The absence of such "monopoles" is an interesting puzzle and scientists haven't given up hope of finding them. Some theories predict that they should exist, but be very difficult to form artificially. There may be magnetic monopoles left over from the big bang, but we haven't found any yet.


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