MLA Citation: Bloomfield, Louis A. "Question 1260"
How Everything Works 22 Oct 2017. 22 Oct 2017 <http://howeverythingworks.org/print1.php?QNum=1260>.
1260. I cannot understand a step-up transformer. Why is the voltage doubled when we double the secondary turns? What isn't it possible to have a dc transformer; since the law of induction says that when a current passes through a conductor it provides a magnetic field, isn't it the same as ac? — C
A transformer only works with ac current because it relies on changes in a magnetic field. It is the changing magnetic field around the transformer's primary coil of wire that produces the electric field that actually propels current through the transformer's secondary coil of wire.

When dc current passes through the primary coil of wire, the coil does have a magnetic field around it, but it doesn't have an electric field around it. The electric field is what pushes electric charges through the secondary coil to transfer power from the primary coil to the secondary coil. In contrast, when ac current passes through that primary coil of wire, the magnetic field around the coil flips back and forth in direction and this changing magnetic field gives rise to an electric field around the coil. It is this electric field that pushes on electrically charged particles—typically electrons—in the secondary coil of wire. These electrons pick up speed and energy as they move around the secondary coil's turns. The more turns these charged particles go through, the more energy they pick up. That's why doubling the turns in a transformer's secondary coil doubles the voltage of the current leaving the secondary coil.


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