How Everything Works
How Everything Works How Everything Works
 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
 
Question 130

For aerosol sprays such as Lysol, are they essentially creating "dustlike" particles that float in the air?
Yes, except that the word "float" isn't what you really mean. An aerosol is a suspension of fine solid or liquid particles in a gas. What holds those particles up against their downward weights isn't the buoyant force—these particles are much more dense than the gas that surrounds them. Instead, it's viscous drag. When the particles begin to fall downward through the gas, they experience such large upward viscous drag forces that they reach terminal velocity at only about 1 millimeter-per-second. The slightest breeze carries the particles with it so that they rarely have a chance to settle to the floor because of gravity. In an aerosol spray, the particles are carried forward by the gas emerging from the bottle and they hit the surfaces in front of the bottle.
         

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