How Everything Works
How Everything Works How Everything Works
 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
 
Question 1088

When an object is free falling, I understand that the earth's gravity causes its velocity to increase at 10 meters/second2 in the downward direction. Is there a point at which this object would reach a "terminal velocity" in the earth's atmosphere and cease to accelerate? — CS, Sykesville, MD
Yes, most objects will reach a terminal velocity and stop accelerating downward. The faster an object drops, the more air resistance it experiences. This air resistance pushes the object upward and at least partially cancels the downward force of gravity—the object's weight. When the object's downward speed becomes high enough, the upward air resistance force exactly cancels the object's downward weight. At that point, the object experiences zero net force and it no longer accelerates. Instead, it descends at a constant downward velocity—its terminal velocity. This terminal velocity is determined partly by the object's density and size and partly by its aerodynamics. Large, dense, and aerodynamic objects tend to have very large terminal velocities while small, low-density, non-aerodynamic objects tend to have very small terminal velocities.
         

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